3.04.2013

On to surgery!

Internal Medicine is officially complete!  My husband enjoyed it more than anticipated, particularly the last two weeks when he was following various cardiologists.  He kind-of-sort-of loved that.  To the point that it might be an actual, real life possibility, which is both exciting and a little scary.  For those not in the medical world, the post-med school training that would require includes a three year internal medicine residency, a three year cardiology fellowship, and an additional year to be an interventional cardiologist, which my husband would definitely do if he went this route.  This also means we'd have an 8-year-old before my husband got his first real job, but we won't think or talk about that ;)  A perk of doing an internal medicine residency?  So many possible sub-specialties...meaning that if my husband changed his mind from cardiology during residency, he would have plenty of other options available.

Surgery is up next!  His first day was today, but it was all orientation/scrub sessions/gowning/gloving.  Hopefully he will actually get to do some hands-on stuff quickly. 

We're fully anticipating that this will be an intense rotation.  My husband will report to the hospital at 5am daily (this would be a great rotation for me to learn how to fall back asleep!).  There is one week of night float (four overnight shifts), two evening calls (staying until 9pm after a regular shift), two 24-ish hour calls (a Friday morning-Saturday morning and a Saturday morning to Sunday morning), and one Sunday all day call.  

Any other 3rd year wives (or those further along) with insight into this surgery rotation?  Is it as terrible horrible no good very bad awesome as we're anticipating?  Because it sounds....fun. 

You know what is actually fun?  Medical Mondays blog hop...visit some new blogs and meet some new medical friends!  


9 comments:

  1. I hope he likes his surgery rotation. My advice? Always keep plastic garbage bags near the front of the garage... just in case he has to throw away his shoes. I'm not joking. GROSS!
    Glad to see you on the Medical Monday Bloghop!!! Thanks for linking up :)

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  2. Surgery is pretty awesome:-) And don't worry about your son being 8 before your husband starts practicing. Our son just turned 8 this year and we start practicing this summer. It's not so bad. Thanks for linking up with Medical Mondays!

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  3. We will be going through surgery in October and have it done by Christmas for a much needed break. I'll be looking to your blog for a surgery report :) first up for us is Family med!

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  4. Y wasn't a huge fan of surgery - I don't think his personality meshed with the personalities of the surgeons in his program. Plus, in his program, there was a ton of frustrating standing in the corner without being able to see anything -- and not being allowed to leave. I hope y'all's is better!

    Agree with the shoe comment above. Although Y had to throw away his shoes on his OB rotation :)

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  5. As I recall, my husband's surgery rotation was the most time-consuming. I was working nights at the time, he was working long days (and sometimes nights!). It was one of those rotations we got through... we had dinner together when we could, we hung out when we could, and honestly, there were a lot of times where I spent an evening watching him sleep. That being said, my husband knew he wanted to do a surgical speciality so while it was an intense rotation for him, it was a good one since he was interested. I definitely agree though... make him change out of those scrubs and shoes ASAP! I'm talking at the front door. The things they come home covered in....

    My child isn't 8, but I remember adding up how long everything was going to take for husband to finish all his training (residency + fellowship = 6 years total) and being horrified that we'd be almost 32 by the time he was done and getting into practice. We're almost there (4 months residency + 1 year of fellowship left) and it really hasn't been that bad. Honestly, it has absolutely flown!

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  6. Our surg. rotation wasn't the favorite rotation. From the student side it wasn't the best because N was at a pretty big hospital, where there were A LOT of people ahead of him to do things. It was hours and hours of just standing and watching, maybe getting to hold a retractor. BUT classmates who were in smaller hospitals got a lot more hands-on experience, and loved the rotation. From the sig.o. side the hours were long, but we're kinda getting used to that now, eh?

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  7. Your blog is so darling, glad to find u on MM. Third year seems so exciting bc you are on the cusp of figuring out what your hubby is going to do for reals....we have a couple years until then and as YOU KNOW and mention a however gazillion years after that. ;) But, who's counting?! Here's to livin in the moment!

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  8. My husband hated surgery - surgeons aren't his favorite people, turns out. Also, it was such a pain to go into a surgery and not have any idea what time it would finish. Some surgeries that were supposed to last 6 hours lasted 10. On the other hand, some 10 hour surgeries turned into 1 hour (if cancer had metastasized too much, etc.)

    Sounds like your hours might be more set though. Good luck!

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  9. my husband is a surgery resident. we have two kids. been together over a decade. he will be 39 when he gets his first real doctor job. (this is his second career). surgery isn't for everyone (doctor and spouse). it's rough and painful but i hear the guaranteed salary is second to none. better be if he has to do emergency surgery in the middle of the night a few times a month into his 40's and 50's. your ms3 surgery rotation sounds like ours. he was at a malignant school/program and matched at a family friendly place that honors family time and the "80" hour work week. i was incredibly pregnant with our first working 60 hours a week myself in a classroom. if you can't get through surgery and/or he absolutely hates it then you know to go in a different direction post graduation. i think surgeons who are happy are nice people. unhappy doctors can be a real pain in the REAR regardless of specialty=)

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